Center(pieces) of attention

Thus far, we have only worked with one-sided arrangements. Meaning, they’ve had some sort of backdrop. This week, however, we tackled centerpieces.

First up, a round centerpiece. After gathering leather, lemon leaf, solidago and spray and spider mums, we each got a small round dish and a chunk of florist foam. Wet florist foam.

Growing u,p, I had often seen florist foam, because my mom enjoys creating her own decorations for our table. However, she always used fake materials — plastic plants and other non-living items. So the florist foam she used was always dry, like a green, over-sized, overly-dense packing peanut.

Filled with water, however, florist foam becomes surprisingly heavy.

While I had no issue with creating a round piece to be viewed from all sides, I did begin to wonder if there would be any foam left beneath the flowers by the time I was done. My mistake, I realized when it was too late, was not cutting the stems in such a way that a very thin part entered the foam. Overall, though, I thought the arrangement turned out very well.

When class resumed later in the week, we disassembled the round centerpiece. The poor foam beneath was indeed ravaged from the unforgiving stems. Luckily, we got a new dish (oval instead of round) and a new piece of foam for the day’s arrangement.

Keeping in mind my mission to spare the foam as much as possible, I started on a new centerpiece, larger than the last but reusing the same materials. Our professor also provided us with more leather, mini carnations, hypericum berries and stalks of myrtle.

Some fun facts: when you rub the myrtle leaves together, it smells like pepper and hypericum, the berries’ family, is St. John’s wort, a plant valued for its many medicinal uses.

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